This Blog has been moved………

5 04 2011

Thank you for following Dean Hansen’s Recruiting Blog. I have decided to move the blog and change the name, not that one name is any better than the other, but I changed it and I hope that you’ll follow me on my new Hire Helper blog.

http://hirehelper.wordpress.com

All posted can be read on the Hire Helper Blog. Thanks again for reading!





You Need Experience To Get a Job But You Need a Job To Get Experience

28 03 2011

So, you’ve completed your degree and you’re ready to get to work. The only problem is that no one will hire you because you don’t have experience. So now, you want a job to gain experience and you can’t get a job because you don’t have the experience because you can’t get the job.

First, I would not apply through a recruiter for any direct hire opportunities. Since you are not the “Perfect” candidate because you lack the industry experience most hiring managers will feel like they are taking a chance by hiring you. When you apply through a recruiter the company will have to pay that recruiter a fee if you are hired. While this is not always a determining factor it’s usually in the hiring manger’s mind when determining the cost of bringing you on as a new employee.

Secondly, explore contract assignments. While they may not pay as well as your current occupation, a pay cut may be required to get your foot in the door. Most companies will lower the qualifications for contract positions even though they don’t lower the compensation, compared to the direct hire candidate so the pay cut may not always be required. Some companies actually hire contract employees directly, but more have these positions outsourced contract staffing firms so if you are going this route you may be speaking with the recruiters who I told you not to speak with in my first suggestion.

Lastly, whenever possible take part in activities that help increase your resume. For example, you could volunteer once a week for a non-profit group that has some type of significance to the jobs you are looking for. By taking part in real world activities you can include them on your resume and show that you are still active even though you may be working a full time job which is not related to pay the bills.





Should your LinkedIn profile say you’re a consultant?

27 03 2011

There are a lot of people out there looking for opportunities. Many experienced professionals take consulting assignments in order to pay the bills or keep them active in the industry. This is great and many consultants end up receiving job offers from the companies they work for upon completion of their assignments. Others do well and gain valuable experience that builds their resumes and contributes to landing future positions.

What I often notice as I browse LinkedIn profiles is many people in this situation post their current roles and place “Consultant” in the job title. Unless you are a true consultant who wishes to jump from company to company working on special projects do not put Consultant as your job title on LinkedIn. I suggest using the title that would be assigned to the role that you are filling. I’m in no way suggesting that you be at all misleading. I feel that you should include the fact that you are in a temporary role in the details for your position.

My reason for not using the word “Consultant” in your title is that it’s directly going against your reason for updating your profile, assuming you are looking for future full-time employment, is that when staffing professionals search for you on LinkedIn they will often assume that you are seeking future consulting roles.

As with most web-based searches there are weighted elements that are used for quantifying results. In the case of LinkedIn job title is the most heavily weighted. To prove this try doing a LinkedIn search for someone with your exact job title and I’ll bet that you’ll come up in your search. Further evidence can be seen when you conduct a search and your result yields profiles of people who have only included job titles in their profiles. Surely, with over 8,000,000 LinkedIn profiles, your key words would come up in thousands of completely filled out profiles, yet people with job titles matching your search always come up.

If you want to get hired you must think like the people looking to hire. How will they search for you? What words will they choose to find people doing what you want to be doing? Once you’ve thought about it take a second look at the job titles in your profile.

I’d love to hear your opinions regarding this and other post on this blog.





You got the interview, Now what? “Read your Cheat Sheet”

27 03 2011

Most of my previous post discuss how to find jobs or make yourself easy to be found by the people working to fill openings. So, what do you do if you have an interview? Do you run out and make sure your interview suit is dry cleaned, read up on the company you’ll be interviewing with, and get a good night sleep before your interview? Those are all great things to do. But will that be the determining factor of your placement? Perhaps the suit may impress, the preparation will certainly help if they ask you questions, and the good night sleep could make you more energetic, but will the person(s) interviewing you notice?

The thing to remember about and interview is that it’s as much about you meeting with the company as it is about you meeting with the company. As a recruiter I’m always expected to provide pertinent information that the candidate should have prepared for their big day. The fact is that there is typically very little I can provide in detail. Interviewers judge candidates on an unlimited amount of factors when determining who they would hire. We all talk to people who were members of the teams who interviewed us when taking a job. I’m sure that you’ve all heard stories regarding the discussions that took place when your candidacy was considered. Most of the ones that I’ve heard about myself are hardly relevant to the job.

My point is that 80 percent of the interview process is out of your control and half the decision has already been made. The people who are interviewing you have already decided if they like you or not. They are meeting you for one of only two reasons. They are speaking with you because they feel that you are really worth speaking to and they WANT to give you the job or someone in HR told them that they should really interview at least three people before making any hire because it’s the right thing to do. In either event, it’s either a good thing or a bad thing right from the start and you can’t control it.

The only thing that you can do is to be prepared to discuss the items that are on your resume. Your resume is what got you to this point. What more could they want to know? Just think back on every interview you’ve ever been on. They will ask you about things on your resume every single time. I give this advice to every candidate that I send in for an interview. “KNOW WHAT’S ON YOUR RESUME, IT WILL COME UP. Your resume is your INTERVIEW CHEAT SHEET!

So next time you have an interview scheduled sit down and read your CHEAT SHEET!





RSS feeds save time in your job search

14 10 2010

To search for opportunities takes a lot of effort. It’s highly unlikely that you will find a job very quickly in the current job climate. The way I see it is that there are only a few ways to learn of new opportunities.

1. Directly visiting target companies websites to see if new jobs are posted
2. Visiting Job boards
3. Social networking to learn of new opportunities
4. Directly contacted by a recruiter who wants to present a job.

In a recent poll that I conducted on LinkedIn a majority of the respondents indicated that they found their current role through a direct application to the company. So, the question comes, “How do I learn about these jobs so I can apply directly to the company?” Looking at the above list of options the only ones that you have significant control over are the first three, with number 3 depending a lot on chance and who you know or are connected to right now.

The first two choices both require diligence on the part of the job seeker. Weather you decide to check the job boards hourly, daily, or weekly is often associated with the amount of time you have and how desperate you are to find your next opportunity.

This is where I’ll be focusing today. I suggest you set up RSS feeds to alert you on daily activity in the job field. Most major employers permit you to subscribe to an RSS feed for their currently open opportunities. All of the major job boards allow you to conduct a keyword search and then subscribe to a search specific job feed. You can then have all of the jobs come directly to you rather than visiting each and every company or job board periodically.

There are numerous ways to check your feeds. If you have a smart phone just conduct a quick search in your application market and you will be given several options for RSS feeds. If you don’t have a smart phone you can always use the computer and countless methods to follow your feeds.

I haven’t gone into great detail about RSS feeds because I’m confident that a simple internet search will be more effective in locating information from more tech savvy professionals than myself. I just thought that I would present another option to help you in your career search.